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Posts Tagged ‘Third Person’

Book Review: The Elvenbane by Andre Norton & Mercedes Lackey

September 15, 2012 Leave a comment

Dragons have been spreading rumors of The Elvenbane to sew seeds of trouble among the elves who are cruel to their human slaves.  Neither dragons nor elves are native to this world, but while the elves have conquered the native humans, the Dragons have opted to hide in seclusion.  The Elvenbane follows the story Shana, a half-blood outcast raised by the Dragons and the subsequent rise of the half-blood wizards years after the last rebellion had been put down by the Elven Lords.

The story is told from the various points of views of people within the world (third person) but focuses mostly on Shana, Alara (a dragon shaman and Shana’s foster mother), and her son Kemanorel.  The story actually starts with the point of view of Shana’s mother, Serina Daeth who is a concubine of one of the elven lords.  Serina  became pregnant with a forbidden half-blood child and is fleeing for her life at the start of the story. Read more…

Sometimes The Movie Is Better Than The Book – Sometimes Not

September 9, 2012 Leave a comment

There are some people who insist that the book is always better than the movie.  I don’t agree.  There are so many factors that go into what makes a good movie and what makes a good book.  I’ve seen my share of movies that actually trump the book they were based on.  As much as Tolkien fanboys disagree, Peter Jackson’s interpretation of Tolkien’s Lord of the Ring trilogy was far superior to the books in my opinion.  Tolkien’s prose is, well, cumbersome, clumsy, and a little bulky.  I still liked the books, although only The Two Towers ranks in my top 20 fiction/fantasy/science fiction books of all time.  I know, sacriledge!  Don’t care. Read more…

The Problem With “Young Adult”

July 9, 2012 Leave a comment

I don’t know about anyone else, but I am really frustrated by the category Young Adult, aka YA, in fiction. I swear, if you ask ten different people to define “young adult” you get ten different answers.

The basis is usually the same and the actual definition is that the story must appeal to a teenage audience and be marketed towards them. But then things diverge quickly from there. Some people claim that the main characters themselves must been teenagers (i.e. Young Adults). Some people claim that the characters don’t need to teenagers, but that they must deal with the problems teens face. Some claim that it is ONLY a distinction in how the book is marketed, i.e. to Young Adults as previously stated. Some people even claim that a story being written in cinema style third person omniscient POV makes a story YA.

Read more…

Using A Bit Player To Reinforce A Point

February 2, 2012 Leave a comment

I’ve begun to revisit my novel Under The Darkened Moon. I know I last said that I was going to do some free writing exercises and post them here. However due to some computer an server issues this past week getting online has been problematic.

So instead of pulling my hair out over those things I went back to something I already had started. I have nearly done a full rough edit of the novel, finding some major things that needed work including plot holes and inconsistencies you could drive a MAC truck through sideways and taken care of them. Other items I marked for review and further pondering. Now I am nearing the end of the novel and I am struggling with the way it was originally written. Towards the end of the novel I introduce a couple new characters who are just really bit players in the story. They are not there for the reader to become attached to. Although each has their purpose they roughly appear for no more than 50 pages of overall story.

One of these characters I introduce to show and reinforce in the minds of the reader the concept of the racism that exists in the world from humans directed at elves. Throughout the book up to this point the reader experiences this racism through the POV of the main character which is third person limited in nature. The main character’s friend who appears in many scenes with him serves as the major conduit for the expression of this racism throughout the novel previously. But by introducing a second character whom the main character interacts with on a similar level, while at the same time removing the original character who expressed these feelings, I originally felt that this reinforced this part of the story. It was meant to get the reader to understand that this racism is much deeper than just one particular character. While this is implied often throughout the story there is never the other heavy handed antagonist to reinforce it.

Now however I am not so sure about this tactic. This character’s part in the story is so small that it almost seems out of place and awkward. But at the same time it still seems to convey larger sentiments that I wanted conveyed.

I will have to ponder whether or not the introduction of this bit player at such a late point in the story is good for the overall story or not. I still think it is but I am not as sure of it as I once was.

Writing a prologue

July 25, 2011 Leave a comment

I have written a couple thousand more words to my story over the weekend. I’ve started to get into the meat of things at this point where the main character is well on his journey.

While I have at times thrown in some backstory as conversations between characters allow I am left wondering if the entire setting of the story and the overarching world conflict is well enough defined to someone who might be reading this story. To me things are well understood, but I am the writer and not a typical reader. I understand that this is just a first, rough draft but I want to be sure everything makes sense to the reader. I have gone back through much of what I have written looking for places to expound but do not see many if any.

Thus I have opted to go back and write a prologue to the story. Since my setting is a robust world and the story is being told from a limited third person POV (as of right now) prejudices and perceptions of the main character simply prevent major knowledge of the world’s past from being known or seen through untainted opinions.

This prologue may not work out but I am going to try it. It may even get looped into the main body of the story later on. I don’t have an aversion to prologues but I know some authors and readers do for their own reasons. I have seen prologues that work and ones that do no.

I plan on using a standard prologue which is to give background and knowledge to the reader about things that happened before the main story and before the characters of the story were even born. I do not plan on using it to introduce the main or sub characters of the story as a sort of Chapter 1.

Still looking for the short story I set out to write though. Until that crops up I plan on plugging ahead with this longer work.