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Posts Tagged ‘Target Audience’

Warning: Readers Have Comfort Zones

October 14, 2012 2 comments

Writers sometimes get a little too crazy.  One thing we often do is try to show how smart we are by using what are known as ten dollar words.  I call it the Plethora Rule.  What is the Plethora Rule?  It is best described from the scene that made me realize long ago that fancy words are not always good.  Here is that scene from ¡Three Amigos! that introduced 90% of people who know what plethora means to the word:

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Book Review: The Man in the Cinder Clouds (Review by: Sher A. Hart)

July 12, 2012 Leave a comment

By: Sher A. Hart

Please read the blurb to learn the premise. Who could resist a book written by an elf about the origins of Santa Clause? I couldn’t, and I’m a little past (okay, way past) the target audience’s age. The book was a little like the Princess Bride, a story inside a story. In this case, I’d say nested Christmas presents, and altogether a very nice package with plenty of excitement in the unwrapping.

Too bad I had to fly back home before I finished reading to my sister’s grandchildren. We went through 8 chapters while driving around seeing Christmas displays. Every time we got back in the car, they wanted more. I was sad they never got to enjoy some very funny stuff about the animals pulling the sleigh, not the ones you think. Rick’s dialogue was often funny, an important skill to keep kids and teens entertained. Okay, adults too.

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Writers Say Change But Most Readers Say Stand Pat

April 11, 2012 Leave a comment

It is funny. Or maybe it is sad. Several people are reviewing my recent draft of Under the Darkened Moon and it is easy to tell who is a writer and who is a reader based on their comments.

Everyone who is a “writer” has a plethora of suggestions. Not all of them are bad suggestions. But a lot of them I consider petty and nothing more than being along the lines of “I wouldn’t do [insert item here] that way”. Is it wrong I ask? Of course they say it is not but stress how they would change said item if it were their story. Ok, so I am basically chalking such things up as style conflicts between myself and them.

Now flip to the group who are “readers” of fantasy novels. Being my target audience I care more about their opinions. Those petty discussion points of not doing something a “certain way” almost never come up. The reader group has actually caught a few minor contradictions in the plot that I had missed but that the authors group completely missed while they were busy trying to make my writing more like their own. And the reviews have been more positive from those that are readers compared to authors. The group of readers of fiction are more apt to suggest not changing anything except the obvious errors.

Moving forward the story’s edits are coming along well. I hate to cut out the “authors” from the editing process but I am seriously finding that their comments are far less helpful than those who consume such stories for pleasure.